The role of light in the growth and development of plants

Horticulture

Horticulture

  • The role of light in the growth and development of plants

    • Control the light period by extending the natural day length with artificial light.
    • Supplements daylight in greenhouses with "growth-light".
    • Replaced daylilght with artificial light for ultimate climate control (cultivation without daylight).

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Product family information

Plant growth (photosynthesis) is not determined by lux or energy, but by the photons from the blue to red (400–700 nm) part of the spectrum. This is called growth light! For horticulture, natural daylight (global radiation) is in most cases measured in terms of energy (J orW) with a solar meter. This meter is generally positioned on top of the greenhouse.The value of global radiation is important for climate and humidity control in the greenhouse. Agrolite XT lamps are specially developed for maximum growth light and are among the most efficient light sources available for horticulture.

Features

High lumen and growth light maintenance safeguards a constant crop quality and quantity over life.
Ceramic discharge tube with PIA technology for long and reliable lifetime.
Simple and robust construction for enhanced reliability and longer life.
Available in 400 and 600 watt(230V,347V,480V) versions.

Applications

Ideal for growing vegetables and flowers.
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Events  

AMO, Windsor

August 14-17, 2016
 

OEMC – Ontario East Municipal Conference

Kingston, Ontario

Sept. 14-16, 2016

 

Union of British Columbia Municipalities

Victoria, BC

Sept. 26-30, 2016

 

FQM - Fédération québécoises des municipalités

Québec, QC

Sept. 28-Oct 1, 2016

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